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Discussion Starter #1
ok, so to keep it quick, i replaced a pair of pads last week... didnt have a pair to do the other side... left the piston compressed for a week... did the other side last night... i noticed when i compressed the piston, it would want to push back out 1/8" as soon as i backed off the c clamp. whatever... got the pads in, caliper on, all buttoned up... then, before i dropped the jack, i realized the wheels would not turn easily... both fronts. it almost seems like someone is slightly holding the brakes down. took it for a quick spin, came back, and the same thing.

in my car id expect that compressing the pistons got some dirt in there and my caliper is sticking... but i find it very unlikely that it would happen to 2 at the same time. and its not like they are getting stuck on, after a hard braking period.. its like they are at 50%.

im wondering if leaving the one caliper completely compressed for a week did something? im hoping to let it sit for a bit and see if it "settles out?" , but beyond that, im kind of stumped.


maybe it is time for yfz brakes! haha.
 

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I assume you bled the brakes?
 

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You removed thin pads and replaced with thick pads. Master cylinder is trying to return to the same position if you don’t bleed off the pressure, so it’s applying the brakes at all times.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You removed thin pads and replaced with thick pads. Master cylinder is trying to return to the same position if you don’t bleed off the pressure, so it’s applying the brakes at all times.
i have seriously never ever once heard of bleeding the brakes for a pad change, and just looked all over the internet and its pretty unanimous that it isnt necessary, but ill give it a shot certainly. ive changed probably 50 pair of atv pads in my day too, and this has never happened before. shrug?
 

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Pushing the pucks in without cracking the bleeder to reduce pressure risks damaging the master cylinder. Bleeding will do several things, including making sure the master cylinder still works. Remove the reservoir cap while bleeding to ensure fluid level is dropping with each squeeze of the lever, just don’t let it get low enough to suck in air.
 

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Like Jet said, you should crack the bleeder when pushing the pistons back, dont want to force dirt/rust/ back to the master cylinder.
Dragging brakes are normally stuck pistons, which don't usually change, or restricted brake lines, which will slowly release, after a few minutes.
 
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